January 2017

Julia F. Irwin

Dr. Julia Irwin earned her Ph.D. in History from Yale University and is currently an Associate Professor of History at the University of South Florida. An award-winning author, she has published widely on the place of humanitarian aid in 20th century U.S. foreign relations. Her book, Making the World Safe: The American Red Cross and a Nation’s Humanitarian Awakening, is a history of U.S. international relief efforts during the First World War era. She is now writing a second book, Catastrophic Diplomacy: A History of U.S.

Jayita Sarkar

Jayita Sarkar is a Research Fellow with the Security Studies Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. From the fall of 2017, she will be an Assistant Professor of International Relations at Boston University’s Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies. Dr. Sarkar's research projects have been funded by the Stanton Foundation, Harvard University's Project on Managing the Atom, Swiss National Science Foundation, Lyndon Johnson Foundation and Gerald Ford Foundation.

David C. Atkinson

Atkinson's recently published book, The Burdens of White Supremacy: Containing Asian Labor Migration in the British Empire and the United States draws upon archival research in Australia, Canada, Great Britain, New Zealand, and the United States. It explores efforts to restrict Japanese and South Asian immigration during the first decades of the twentieth century.

Patrick Michael Kirkwood

A Belfast-born Scot. Ph.D. from Central Michigan University in Imperial History (2016). Faculty Member @ MCC-Blue River, where I teach US and World history. I write on inter-imperial exchanges focused on the American and British empires in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. So far I've been published in the Michigan Historical Review, Civil War History, and the Journal of World History.

Ekavi Athanassopoulou

Ekavi Athanassopoulou (MA, PhD, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London) is Assistant Professor of International Relations, University of Athens. Research Associate of the Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy (ELIAMEP) (1999-). Author of: Strategic Relations between the U.S. and Turkey: 1979-2000; Turkey: Anglo-American Security Interests, 1945-1952: The First Enlargement of NATO; A Triangular Relationship, The U.S., Turkey and Israel, 1948-2010 (in preparation).

Robert K. Brigham

Robert K. Brigham, Shirley Boskey Professor of History and International Relations, joined the Vassar College faculty in 1994. He is a specialist on the history of U.S. foreign policy, particularly the Vietnam War. Brigham is author or co-author of nine books, including Iraq, Vietnam, and the Limits of American Power (PublicAffairs, 2008); Is Iraq Another Vietnam? (PublicAffairs, 2006); Argument Without End: In Search of Answers to the Vietnam Tragedy (PublicAffairs, 1999), written with former Secretary of Defense Robert S.

Thomas I. Faith

Historian at the Department of State and author of "Behind the Gas Mask: The US Chemical Warfare Service in War and Peace," I also edit publications for the Society for History in the Federal Government. I was formerly the history and political science teacher at the US House of Representatives Page School, and have earned fellowships from the Chemical Heritage Foundation and the Eleanor Roosevelt Papers. My PhD was earned at George Washington University, and my BA is from Temple University in Philadelphia, PA.

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