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Secondary Education

To Higher Education Faculty:

As you probably know, SHAFR is currently working with secondary teachers to create lesson plans around a series of topics in the history of American foreign relations. (More information is available below.)

After consultations with the Council and the Teaching Committee in Madison, I am developing a list of SHAFR members who would be willing to be Faculty Partners on the project. Your role as a Faculty Partner would be to be available via email to a secondary teacher who is completing one of the lesson plans. Our hope is that having this partnership will encourage more teachers to write lesson plans for the project.

For example, if you were to volunteer to be a Faculty Partner for early American diplomacy a teacher might send you a note about a couple of primary sources for the Louisiana Purchase and ask your thoughts about using them in the classroom. I will be matching SHAFR Faculty Partners and our teachers writing the lesson plans only when there are specific questions for you.

I know we are all very busy, but I don’t expect this will take much time at all, and it will be a valuable service to our teachers. Please consider it.

If you are interested, simply send me a note at tullyj@ccsu.edu indicating which areas and/or lesson plans you would be willing to be available for should questions arise.

 Best,

 John Tully

 SHAFR Director of Secondary Education

To Secondary Education Faculty:

The Society of Historians of American Foreign Relations is looking for contributors to a new series of lesson plans for secondary teachers. Our first set of topics is below.

 If you are a secondary history teacher and would like to be considered as a contributing editor for one or more of the topics, please submit a one paragraph summary of how you would approach the topic and a brief C.V. to the SHAFR Director of Secondary Education, John Tully.

 Questions? Contact John Tully, Central Connecticut State University

 The Jay Treaty

The Louisiana Purchase

War of 1812: Another War for Independence?

The United States and the Republic of Texas

Slavery and Civil War Diplomacy

The Philadelphia World’s Fair, 1876

The Philippines after the Spanish-American War

Wilson’s Vision of the Postwar World

FDR and Great Britain in the 1930s

The Yalta Conference

The Marshall Plan

How “Cold” was the Cold War?

The United States and Iran: Troubled Past

Was the Space Race about Space?

The United States and the Middle East: 1945-1967

Nixon Goes to China

Ronald Reagan and the End of the Cold War

The Bush Doctrine: Old or New Strategy?

 Lesson Plan Format:

 National Standards: (Taken from http://nchs.ucla.edu/standards/)

Connections: (Common elements with other lesson plans; relation of lesson

plan to other non-explicit foreign relations topics)

Time:

Objectives:

Initiation:

Learning Activities:

Closure:

Other Ideas:

Other Primary Sources:

Further Reading: